February wrap up and it feels like Spring is on the way!

Finally, finally it feels like the world is getting a little bit lighter and brighter. Signs of spring are peeping through in greater numbers everyday and it feels like everyone is daring to hope again.

After a long, cold January, February seems to have rushed past me. There have been so many interesting and amazing books published this month and March looks like a pretty bumper month too. As well as reading as much as I can, when home school, online and in school teaching has allowed(!), I have been trying to write; working on my never ending WIP!

As far as new releases go this month I have had the pleasure to read some absolute crackers. I started the month pleasantly lost in both the possibilities of time travel and 70’s childhood nostalgia with the quirky Space Hopper by Helen Fisher. And ended it immersed in the mind blowing book that is The Last House on Needless Street by Catriona Ward . Published next month my review is in the pipeline, but there is so much to assimilate first!

Back to this month’s releases and I was thrilled to be reading Patricia Lockwood’s first novel No one is talking about this. I found her memoir Priestdaddy a truly unforgettable book and as you will see from my review her first novel was equally as impressive and challenging.

Continuing the theme of challenge and rawness and we come to Daisy Buchanan’s Insatiable. An exploration of sexuality, lust and pushing all boundaries this book is not easily forgotten!

While we find ourselves still in lockdown, travelling through my reading has become even more important to me. This month I have found myself ‘back’ in places familiar; the streets of Paris in Jane Smiley’s gorgeous The Strays of Paris and in places totally foreign and waiting to be explored. From 1970’s Uganda in the wonderful debut novel Kololo Hill by Neema Shah to the battlefields of France, and the streets of New Orleans in Michael Farris Smiths Gatsby inspired Nick.

Next month is filled with absolute treats of new releases and I am working my way through some of them. I have just finished the wonderful mystery that is The Lamplighters by Emma Stonex and my review is out this week.

And looking ahead to April I loved my buddy read with four fab book friends, Emma (@corkyorky), Jules (@julesbuddle), Rebecca (@_forewoodbooks) and Siobhain (@thelitaddict_). Tall Bones by Anna Bailey kept us all on the edge of our seats, full review on it’s way very soon!! As is our next buddy read!

And in amongst all these varied novels, I have been dipping in to the oasis of poetry that is Empty Nest: Poems for families edited by Carol Ann Duffy. This is the perfect collection for these times when family can seem both really close and yet so, so far away. Beautifully put together, diverse and insightful. Just lovely in every way.

So there we so. A whistle stop tour of February’s reading. Hold on to your hats for March!!

Rachel x

Book review: No One is Talking About This – Patricia Lockwood

I have put off this review until today. I can’t put it off any longer. But from the outset I accept there is just no way I can do this incredible book justice but equally no way I am not going to review it.

When I read Priestdaddy two years ago, I knew I had found a writer who I would read for the rest of my life. As a it was memoir was biting, edgy funny and raw. The talent of Lockwood to pull you into this family and push at all your boundaries was just extraordinary and I instantly wanted more. So when I knew this novel was on the horizon I was delighted to managed to obtain a proof. And it was perfection all over again.

This is a story told in bites; delicious, sharp, salty bites by an unnamed but vivid narrator. It is a tale of two halves, two perspectives and from two very different places and spaces.

Our narrator lives her life on and through the ‘portal’, a social media platform which seems to be a thinly disguised Twitter. She is an internet sensation, regularly travelling the globe to talk about the internet and her life within it. Set in the age of Trump, we see how life online is all consuming, all pervading and impossible to both quantify and escape. There is a air of unreality to the first half, which shocks even more when we start to recognise that it is all based on and in crazy truth.

Like all great writing with a nod to the dystopian, there nothing that Lockwood explores that isn’t already happening. From cancel culture, to online shaming, to the every changing goal posts of judgement and perceived morality, Lockwood lays it all bare. And makes us all complicit.

And then life gets real. Away from the portal the narrator’s sister is pregnant. Her unborn child has a rare genetic defect and life is scary, uncertain and totally consuming. Real life has broken in and suddenly the heated and theoretical discussion of women’s reproductive rights in right wing America isn’t a hashtag, or a thread to hang your buzz words on. It’s real. And so is life, and love and grief.


Throughout this novel the prose is like poetry , challenging, biting and evocative. It is one of those rare and beautiful books where each line is perfectly constructed . Where each sentence, each phrases seem to be competing with the next, whilst at the same time complimenting it and holding it up.

This is a novel you could read a thousand times and find something different each time. In fact, scrap that, you could probably read just a single page, a paragraph, even a line a thousand times and find something new each time. You will read this book with your eyes wide open and your brain screaming, “Pay Attention!”


This is a novel both alive with disconnect and stark, alarming reality; both present at the same time and both demanding your attention. It explores how true connection if found, made and sustained in this age where we believe we more connected than ever before. It is about what matters and what doesn’t, and how the two seem to have merged, how the digital and actual seem to have meshed into one, each feeding the other. And it’s about the extremes that are needed to break this spell

Words can’t express this importance of this book. It needs to absorbed, mere reading won’t do.

Rachel x

#BlogTourReview: A Net for Small Fishes by Lucy Jago

Today it is my turn on the blog tour for A Net for Small Fishes by Lucy Jago published on 4th February by Bloomsbury. Huge thanks to Ros Ellis for inviting me along…and without further ado let me take to the court of James I . But keep your eyes peeled and your wits about you!

From the first pages of this novel the prose is alive with intrigue, vibrancy and glorious detail. Each page leads us further and further into a court whether appearance is everything and alliances are made and broken in the blink of an eye.

This is the tale of courtiers and power, but our chief guides are Frankie, Frances Howard – Countess of Essex and her confidante, serving woman and friend Anne Turner. Thrown together through circumstance, both women are intelligent, cunning and ready to make the most of whatever opportunity comes their way.

Frankie is trapped in a loveless, abusive marriage to Robert Devereux. Desperate, first to please and then to escape her husband she uses Anne’s knowledge of fashion, apothecary and alchemy to help her.

Anne is a doctor’s wife, but is a business women in her own right, holding a patent to a fashionable yellow starch. But despite her intelligence she remains at the mercy of the fortunes of the rich and crucially the men in her life.

When the King’s favourite Sir Robert Carr catches Frankie’s eye the two women work together to gain the ultimate prize. But to do so they must take unimaginable risks and put everything they have on the line.

From the beginning of this story there is an air of tension, of dangerous games being played with high stakes, where the factions of court are built on the shifting sands of family ties and religion. Where fortunes constantly rise and fall and favourites of the Crown attract as many enemies as they do admirers.

Life at court is a one continual and dangerous game, where the stakes are high, and where women need to rely on what little power they have to keep ahead. For both Frankie and Anne their power lies in their sexuality, cunning and intelligence. And they will need all of this to advance their cause and ultimately stay alive.

This is a story of power, of betrayal but crucially of the friendship and compassion of women. With a cast of characters that are unforgettable, dripping with decadence and detail, and whose fortunes change in the blink of an eye.

Heartbreaking, beautiful and unforgettable.

Rachel x

And there is more…

For more review and reactions to this glorious books, check out the rest of the blog tour below…

Blog Tour Review: Tsarina by Ellen Alpsten

I seem to say this a lot…but I do love historical fiction. I love the places it takes me, it’s ability to transport me away from the daily reality and deposit you somewhere entirely different.

So I always have my eye out for new historical fiction and find it very hard to resist signing up for blog tours when the past is on the cards. When Anne Cater offered me the chance to get on board with Ellen Alpsten’s debut novel Tsarina, published by Bloomsbury, I didn’t even try to resist; I jumped at the chance.

Tsarina begins in 1699. On the cusp of a new century, Russia is in the grip of the Great Northern War. Led by Tsar Peter I, the country is under going a transformation. Peter is well travelled, ambitious and ruthless. His desire to modernise and transform his domains is all consuming, and he will stop at nothing to achieve the Westernised Russia he craves.

Rewards for loyalty and bravery are lavish, but punishment for deception , perceived or otherwise, are brutal in the extreme. The chasm between rich and poor gaps. It is both an exciting and terrifying time to be alive.

As Peter wages war throughout the Baltic, Marta, an illegitimate peasant girl is sold by her family aged just fifteen. Finding herself miles from home and surrounded by brutally, she fears the worse when fate leads her to a Russian battle camp. Here she catches the eye of Peter himself and so begins her spectacular rise to power.

Peter is brutal, but he is also brilliant and charismatic. There is an immediate connection between Marta and himself. She is thrown into the world of excess and riches, becoming Peter’s mistress, living openly with him at court. Showered with material pleasures, Marta is all too aware that her existence hangs continually in the balance. She needs to provide Peter with a true heir, and she needs to maintain his interest in a court full of attractive and ruthless women.

This is a true rags to riches story; the story of how a peasant girl became a Tsarina; the infamous Catherine I of Russia, ultimately a ruler in her own right.

I devoured this book! There is a richness and vitality to the writing that mirrors the turbulent opulence contained within it’s pages. Alpsten is master of the detail. Her ability to transport me from lockdown Britain to 18th Century Russia, never failed to amaze or delight me.

This is one of those novels you get hopelessly lost in, immediately immersed in the prose. Historical fiction fans will undoubtedly love it, but anyone who is looking for a breathtaking story spectacularly told need look no further.

The story of Catherine I has everything, and the writing wrapped around it here gives it that little bit more. I guarantee that once you pick up Tsarina, you won’t be able to put it down.

Ellen Alpsten has created something infused with magic.If you love historical fiction …this one is a feast for the senses and the soul! Enjoy the ride!

Rachel x

And there is more…

For more reactions and reviews check out the rest of the Tsarina Blog Tour …