#Blogtour : Everyone Is Still Alive by Cathy Rentzenbrink

Having read and been deeply moved by Cathy Rentzenbrink’s memoir The Last Act of Love and devoured her wonderful celebration of a lifelong love of reading Dear Reader, I could not believe my luck when the chance to read and review her first novel came my way. Everyone is still alive was published on 8th July by Phoenix and it really is a truly incredible debut.

This is the story of Juliet, recently bereaved, who decides to move her family into her late mother’s home, on the quiet suburban street of Magnolia Road. Her son Charlie is just about to start school and her husband Liam is a writer working, somewhat sporadically, on his second novel. Juliet herself is the main breadwinner and in addition to being side swiped by grief, finds herself juggling all the demands and guilt associated with the life of a working mother.

Magnolia Road has a close knit community; the heart of which are a hub of middle class parents whom Liam seems quickly to become absorbed by. At first Liam views the group as fodder for his new book and claims his daily meet ups are purely for research purposes. But as the weeks go on and bonds of friendship seem to grow Juliet increasingly feels as if she is on the outside looking in.

The dynamics of the group are further complicated when one seemingly stable marriage suddenly crumbles and Liam is pulled further into the emotional turmoil left in it’s wake. Juliet starts to question the foundations of her own marriage and wonders if moving to Magnolia Road was really the solution it seemed to be. As doubt continues to creep closer, life changing moments are just around the corner.

This novel commands with an air of authenticity from the first page to the last. It is populated by a cast of believable and well rounded characters who act with both spontaneity and comforting predictability . Characters who in short make you believe in them. The population of Magnolia Road feels like a community you could walk into, with lives you can both visualise and care about.

Cathy Rentzenbrink has created a plot that pulls you, that shows how the day to day of our lives is just as complex and engaging as events further afield and how the answers to the questions we ask ourselves are actually often not that far away.

Once I stepped into Juliet and Liam’s lives it was actually surprisingly hard to leave! This one of those novels that compelled you to keep turning the pages, but once you got to the end the characters lingered for a good long while. Complex emotions and solid story telling make this a must read of the summer.

Rachel x

And there is more…

For more reviews and reactions to Everyone is still alive check out the rest of the blog tour below…

Book Review – Dear Reader: The Comfort and Joy of Books by Cathy Rentzenbrink

Since all this Covid madness began the one thing I have been missing hugely is hugs. Not being able to throw my arms around a friend or give a colleague a reassuring squeeze is just the hardest thing in the world. So if you, like me are missing your fix, get your hands on Dear Reader: The Comfort and Joy of Books by Cathy Rentzenbrink, because this my friends is a book hug! Huge and heartfelt thanks to Camilla Elworthy at Picador for my gifted copy.

It’s not often these days I sit down to write a blog post with no notes. As I am reading I am usually scribbling away, trying to get my thoughts down. But this review has come from a place of love and instinct; I don’t need any notes to tell you this book spoke immediately to me.

Any book that has embraced and celebrated Rebecca and The Chronicles of Narnia within the first 10 pages is guaranteed to touch a special place within me. These are the books that I return to time and again, that are tied up within my life, woven into the fabric of growing up. So many familiar and favourite books are to be found here. The Cazalet Chronicles, for example provokes an almost identical reaction within me as it does the author; a beautifully constructed time-gone-by saga which gives more of it’s self every time you read it.

And there are books celebrated here that remind me of those I love. I have never read a Catherine Cookson in my life but these novels were the backdrop to my childhood, exchanged every other Sunday by my Mum and my Grandad, each new release eagerly awaited and devoured.

Cathy Rentzenbrink reads compulsively and with passion. I am told I am a quick reader, but I am in awe of her ability to devour three books a day. This book felt like sitting down with a kindred spirit and comparing notes. This isn’t a list of books the author has read; it isn’t a volume of put together reviews; it is a tale of how reading had underpinned, shaped and support a life, through all it’s challenges and joys. And I feel a deep connection with that.

You see reading has helped to build me and it always has the power to put me back together again. For me reading is like breathing. I need to read. In this world of box sets and social media the amount I read each year often seems to provoke constant comment, as if compulsive reading is some kind of disease or affliction. Maybe it is but like the author I am powerless to change now.

Cathy Rentzenbrink has made books her salvation and her career. It is a source of regret to me that no one ever told me and the teenage me never realised, that I could make books the centre of my professional life. Maybe my blog is part of the desire to address this. Or maybe it is way of fulfilling that desire to recommend books to complete strangers in libraries, in book shops and in public transport.

This book felt like coming home to an old friend. My reading list has grown beyond all measure and so has my bookish heart.

Rachel x